Freinsheim historic town wall

Freinsheim

Description

With the advent of firearms, many areas of the Palatinate were vulnerable to attacks. A system of defence was needed. As a result, towns were fortified, primarily in the second half of the 14th century, and this was usually accompanied by the acquisition of town rights. The Freinsheim complex is still largely preserved to this day and is considered a unique attraction of the town. While the medieval town centre was supposed to be protected by the town wall, which originally reached a height of 8 m, things turned out quite differently during the Palatinate War of Succession. The order given by the Sun King to only leave behind scorched earth in the Palatinate ("Brulez le Palatinat!") was taken literally. The destroyed houses were rebuilt in baroque style and the damaged fortifications were repaired. Today, the city wall walk of approximately 1 km surprises visitors with its many picturesque nooks, some of which have been beautifully staged by the residents.
But there is also the chance to view the southern area from the outside. A footpath surrounding the building shows you the way. Alternatively, you can simply pass to the other side of the wall at the Casinoturm. There you will find an opening in the wall. Evidence of at least 20 towers has been found, and 13 of them have been preserved to this day. There were probably even more of them originally. Today, some of the tower ruins are hidden in houses, cellars, garden walls and barns. The town was originally accessible via two gates. There was the Haintor in the southwest and the mighty iron gate in the northeast, which was also called Wormser Tor. With it, fortification was completed in 1514. The towers embedded in the wall were almost all accessible on the city side. Of the 20 or so towers that have been identified, eight can still be seen today, including the Hahnenturm, the Pulverturm, the Casinoturm (also known as the Kitzigturm), the Diebesturm and the Herzogturm.

The Casinoturm houses the "TheaderFreinsheim", Germany's smallest theatre.
Public guided tours take place from April to October every Saturday at 11:15 a.m. Group reservations can be made on request.